Get our free mobile app

The number of people that die every year due to heat-related deaths is up drastically. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). During 2018–2020, a total of 3,066 heat-related deaths occurred in America.

However, Texas leads in the number of people dying due to heatstroke according to the CDC, the numbers are shocking. Here's why Texas leads, we have more "pediatric vehicular heatstroke deaths." The Lone Star State had a total of 134 child deaths from 1998 through 2021.

All those deaths could've been avoided. Texas also leads in the total number of people dying due to heat-related deaths according to NoHeatStroke.org and the CDC.

Photo by: NoHeatStroke.org
Photo by: NoHeatStroke.org
loading...

Heat-related deaths and illnesses in the U.S. account for more people dying annually than those killed in hurricanes, lightning, tornadoes, floods, and earthquakes combined. Heat-related incidents are totally preventable yet annually many people succumb to extreme heat.

To protect yourself when temperatures are 90 degrees or higher, remember to keep cool and use common sense, and follow these common-sense tips:

Photo by Jonathan Chng / Unsplash
Photo by Jonathan Chng / Unsplash
loading...

1. DRINK PLENTY OF FLUIDS

Regardless of your activity level, increase your consumption of fluids. Waiting until you're thirsty to drink something is too late. Do not drink alcoholic beverages, they work in reverse causing your body to dehydrate. Drink at least two to four 8oz glasses of fluids every hour.

Photo by Shayna Douglas / Unsplash
Photo by Shayna Douglas / Unsplash
loading...

2. REPLACE MINERALS

Start replacing the salt, sugar, and minerals in your body right away. Think for just a moment, when the Dallas Cowboys are playing football on a 100-degree day, you see each player drinking those sports drinks to replace those minerals. A sports beverage can replace the salt and minerals that you lost through sweat.

Photo by margot pandone / Unsplash
Photo by margot pandone / Unsplash
loading...

3. WEAR THE RIGHT CLOTHING

Put on the least amount of clothing or the lightest clothing possible when you are at home. Lightweight, light-colored, and loose-fitting clothes are what work best in high-heat. Cover or shade your face by wearing a wide-brimmed hat. Cover other exposed areas because sunburn affects your body's ability to cool itself, and will cause your body to lose fluids.

Photo by Guy Kawasaki on Unsplash
Photo by Guy Kawasaki on Unsplash
loading...

4. USE THE BUDDY SYSTEM

Use a Buddy System, when overheated we tend to lose track of time, forget to reapply sunscreen, drink water, and take breaks. Heatstroke makes a person become confused or lose consciousness. When you are working in the heat, monitor the condition of your co-workers and have someone do the same for you.

Photo by Paolo Bendandi / Unsplash
Photo by Paolo Bendandi / Unsplash
loading...

5. MONITOR THE CHILDREN AND THE ELDERLY

Infants and children are more sensitive to high temperatures and need adults to regulate their environments and provide lots of fluids. Children are in more need of sunscreen because their skin is more sensitive to sunburn.

People age 60 and older need someone who will call and check on them two to three times a day minimum. The elderly may not compensate for heat stress efficiently and are not likely to sense and respond to changes in temperature or consciousness.

People who are physically ill, especially with heart disease or high blood pressure, or who take certain medications are affected by extreme heat. Overweight people are more prone to heatstroke.

The Big Country has already seen days where the temperatures have exceeded the 100-degree mark and many more are coming. For more information on hot weather safety information check with the American Red Cross, and the CDC.

LOOK: The most extreme temperatures in the history of every state

Stacker consulted 2021 data from the NOAA's State Climate Extremes Committee (SCEC) to illustrate the hottest and coldest temperatures ever recorded in each state. Each slide also reveals the all-time highest 24-hour precipitation record and all-time highest 24-hour snowfall.

Keep reading to find out individual state records in alphabetical order.